Grant Summary

Grant Number
K08 HS11418-03
Grant Title
Collaborative Management of Diabetes in Blacks
PI Name
EGEDE, LEONARD E.
RFA/PA
PA00-010 - MENTORED CLINICAL SCIENTIST DEVELOPMENT AWARD
Abstract
EGEDE, LEONARD E MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, CHARLESTON SC Collaborative Management of Diabetes in Blacks K08 HS11418-01 07/01/01 The objective of this application is to develop collaborative management of Type 2 Diabetes in Black Americans. In parallel, the PI's goal is to achieve investigative independence. The central hypothesis is that culturally sensitive collaboration is essential to improving diabetes outcomes in Blacks. This hypothesis is based on the Symbolic Interaction Theory. The ISAS paradigm, a modification of this theory, explains Individual behavior as a response to Symbols (meanings) in relation to both an Audience (health care providers) and the Situation (Systems and social support). Thus, diabetes self-management in Blacks will depend on meanings attached to, and cultural relevance of the provider-patient interaction, and Systems/social support. The rationale for this research is that culturally sensitive collaboration is crucial to changing the poor outcomes of Type 2 Diabetes in Blacks. The three specific aims are to identify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of Black patients that impact their diabetes outcomes, to identify impediments to improved diabetes outcomes in Blacks that are attributable to health care providers, and to identify external factors that impact on diabetes outcomes in Blacks. This research is innovative because it integrates modern, population-based approaches to the management of diabetes with cultural considerations that are relevant to the population of interest. This innovative approach is expected to yield the following outcomes. First, specific cultural impediments to effective treatment of type-2 diabetes in blacks will be identified in both patients and their health-care providers, which will allow prospective targeting of these factors to improve diabetes outcomes. Second, it is expected that important components of collaborative care for blacks with type-2 diabetes will be identified despite cultural differences between patients and providers. Third, because of this rnentored research experience, the principal investigator is expected to attain investigative independence, with sufficient data to be competitive for RO1 funding. Collectively, these outcomes are important, because they are expected to improve the diabetes outcomes of black Americans with Type 2 Diabetes and to add to the cadre of dedicated diabetes health services researchers.
Fiscal Year
2003
Award
$126,630
Department
MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
Grant State/District
SC-6
Project Start
07/01/01
Project End
06/30/07
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